You, too, can master your domain (best and worst names of the week)

[Cache – #50]

Names have jobs to do. Vote on which ones do them best and worst.

When trying to decide upon a new brand name, clients frequently become concerned that they won’t be able to secure that precise domain name. As a result, they are often reluctant to move forward with the brand name they desire. But they shouldn’t automatically throw up their hands. It is not categorically the job of the exact brand name (among the many that great names must do) to be available as a domain name. Instead, it is the name’s job to be at least finnessable into a viable domain name.

With almost every word in the English language already snapped up as a domain, indeed the challenge is very difficult. Fortunately there are always creative workarounds. Porter Airlines, for example, decided to use www.flyporter.com when www.porter.com was unavailable. A US high-tech firm named Revera owns www.revera.com, so for retirement home chain Revera, we bought www.reveraliving.com – which, in that it says something meaningful about the Revera retirement brand, can be considered an improvement over revera.com proper.

Domain names: less important than ever

The reality is that web addresses are becoming less important by the day. So many surfers just type the subject of their search into Google anyway, and if your website has a reasonably effective SEO strategy, your site will rank highly in search returns.

That’s not to say you shouldn’t make your best effort to purchase the exact name you seek. Many domain names, while taken, are in fact owned by organizations whose raison d’etre is to sell them. And if the name you seek is owned by a going concern, they may not be using it, and/or they may be willing to accept a reasonable offer to buy.

But are you really different?

A caution, however: if the name you want is already owned by a going concern, and especially if that business is in the same industry as you, you should consider whether the name you desire is differentiated sufficiently to position you uniquely in the marketplace. And soberingly, it could be an early warning sign that you are risking trademark infringement and the legal action against you that may entail.

Your thoughts?

Who do you think has done the best job of crafting a viable domain name – Porter, Revera, or someone else? And why?  Vote and/or leave a comment.





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