Tangerine Still A Question Mark

[Cache - #153]

 

“Tangerine????” 

In so many words, this has been the typical reaction to Tangerine, the new name for ING Direct.  I submit, however, that it’s unfair to judge a brand name in a vacuum.  We have to wait – to see what meaning its owner has in mind for it.

Tangerine is of course a carrying forward of brand equity from ING Direct’s shade of orange – made famous by a long-running ad campaign with that Dutch guy.

A quick visit to the Tangerine homepage makes clear that the new moniker is meant to embody and convey, in their words, “simple products [and] award-winning client service [to help] Canadians grow their savings and live better lives.”  And also:  ”We believe your money should be able to work as hard as you do.”

On the basis of this espoused positioning, I think the name makes alot of sense.  Tangerine indeed conveys informality and a certain down-to-earth-ness that aligns well with people who are just trying to live a bit better, not make millions.

It is hard to imagine a name that would be more memorable for this particular brand, coming as it does from a brand associated so strongly with orange – and in large part because it so strongly piques curiosity. 

But:  just as it’s been said that a brand ain’t a logo, neither is it a name.  So the true test of name greatness is:  how well does the organization actually deliver on what the name promises?  

Answer:  so far, not so good.

In fact I cannot easily recall an online banking experience more inconvenient than the one I’m having with Tangerine right now.  A valued client, who is a Tangerine customer, sent me an online transfer of funds through the Tangerine system.  It arrived in the form of an email, which requires the recipient to click through to the Tangerine website.  Fair enough.  

But once at the website, instead of simply clicking through to the bank I use (BMO), logging in to my account and then depositing the cash with a few clicks, Tangerine actually wants me to:

  • Go grab one of my cheques – the ones I use from BMO
  • Look at its hieroglyphic print and figure out what my bank’s branch number is
  • Look at its hieroglyphic print and figure out what my bank’s institution number is
  • Enter my account number
  • Re-enter my account number
  • Wait one to two business days – but maybe longer

Screen Shot 2014-04-11 at 5.45.28 PM

Naturally the numbers on my cheques don’t correspond with the image provided by Tangerine, so I couldn’t figure out how to accept the money.

For any bank brand, this process – and especially the (indeterminate) waiting period – is about as non-simple as it gets.  Anyone who has received an Interac email transfer knows you can deposit the money instantly to your account, simply by logging in to it.  One also has to wonder how much Tangerine is making on my money while I am trying to get it, especially in light of their promise not “to nickel and dime you with unfair fees.”

So:  the Tangerine name has great promise, but it is not yet a great name.  Someday, hopefully.

Ditto for the tagline, Forward banking, which currently seems stuck in reverse.


New feature – CacheMeme:
ing guy 2

Previous posts about Tangerine:
Lululemon May Be BS, Tangerine May Be A Peach
Introducing Oaken Financial

IN THE MEDIA:  Andris Pone comment on the Super Bowl, WestJet, Tim Hortons, Lululemon, Indigo and more.

BOOK:  Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo or download a free chapter.

Posted in brand experience, brand names, CacheMeme, key messaging, positioning, taglines | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How Will You Be Judged?

[Cache - #152]

You’re different.  In a good way.  But most of you will do a poor job of expressing your difference to the world.  As a result, you will not be recognized for your unique talents nor be able to use them, and share them, on the scale you would like.  And therefore your potential will go unfulfilled.

Those were the key messages I conveyed last week to a group of young entrepreneurs, members of an organization called Startup Toronto.  Yet I would speak those words to pretty much any group of people, anywhere.  Because, despite the inevitable variety imposed on us by the 7 billion billion billion atoms of which we are made, we use a startlingly narrow range of language and imagery to describe what makes us different – and thus more worthy of more and better customers than the next guy – from the next guy.

Part of the problem is the sheer unwillingness of most people to exercise creativity in the way they talk about their business.  I suppose it must seem like hard work with insufficient ROI, especially when their business is already having success.  On this point, the best I can say is first, congratulations, and second, you’ve been successful despite starting work each day with the equivalent of white shoes, a white belt and a powder blue polyester suit.

Of course, the point must be made that some people, like my late grandfather John Thompson, can rock this look, and hard.  But he was a judge and covered up with a robe at work.  And anyway, the crooks’ impression of his brand was generally not a determining factor in whether they sat in his courtroom.

Another part of the problem is that, even though no two value propositions are identical, the differences between one brand and the next are slim.  Take the quick service food industry.  We should feel reasonably confident that the majority of players in this field are serving fresh food.  So how could a brand possibly build a global empire by saying that hey, we serve fresh food?

Ask Subway: with 41,000 units, the largest chain of restaurants in the world.  Do a word association exercise with anyone and their response to the word “Subway” will be something similar to ”fresh” or “healthy.”

But Subway is not the only restaurant in the world selling fresh or healthy food.  They’ve simply been the most skilled and relentlessly consistent at talking about fresh and healthy:  whether through the Eat Fresh tagline (14 years old) or by backing it up with reasons to believe like Jared, the guy that lost 275 pounds eating Subway subs (campaign also 14 years old).

So, what have we learned?

1.  If you are a judge, your brand is irrelevant.  Feel free to do whatever you want.  As if I had to tell you.
2.  If you are not a judge, brand matters.  The way you say what you say matters.  Looking in the mirror matters.  You can get one cheap from a judge.


New feature – CacheMeme:

john_mcenroe_outfit_cannot_be_serious

IN THE MEDIA:  Andris Pone comment on the Super Bowl, WestJet, Tim Hortons, Lululemon, Indigo and more.

BOOK:  Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo or download a free chapter.

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Posted in brand differentiation, brand messaging, CacheMeme, consistency, key messaging, positioning, reason to believe, taglines | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

March Is Hate Month

[Cache - #151]

This week, Canadian man Yue Liu drowned in Cuba, while saving his son from the same fate.  And someone online questioned whether his last words to his son – ”I cannot save you anymore” – were actually uttered.

This week, Jim Kelly, the former Buffalo Bills quarterback who led his team to four consecutive Super Bowls, was flown on a private jet to New York, to receive treatment for a very aggressive return of oral cancer.  And someone online took the opportunity to trash him.

This week, Maple Leafs’ goalie James Reimer was viciously attacked on social media for his apparent poor play.  And a number of people by the same means attacked his wife, April.

My gut reaction to each of these scenarios is that the haters are barely deserving of description as human.  However, I should balance this instinct against the fact that I live in Toronto, the city in which Rob Ford stands every chance of being re-elected, and hence in which there are an overabundance of people I disagree with and have great difficulty understanding.

Last week, a fellow motorist took exception to a manoeuvre of mine and conveyed his displeasure with an F$&@ YOU!! so loud and melodramatic, he would have achieved the same effect by getting out of his car, lying down face first, and pounding his hands and feet on the pavement.  

But of course, we was not going to get out of his car.  It was the protection of the car that allowed him to safely revert to a baby-like state.  Just as it’s the protection of the keyboard that gives people license to type things they would never say to someone’s face.  To the face of Yue Liu, Jim Kelly, or the Reimers, for example.

Today, thousands of people all over the world will yell obscenities at each other from inside the protective envelope of their cars.  Unlike the people at their keyboards, we can see these people with our own eyes, sometimes by looking at ourselves in the mirror.  These people are not aberrations.  They are the norm.

They have a desperate, desperate need to be heard.

Is your brand listening?

 


NEW FEATURE:  CacheMeme

IN THE MEDIA:  Andris Pone comment on the Super Bowl, WestJet, Tim Hortons, Lululemon, Indigo and more.

BOOK:  Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo or download a free chapter.

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The Promise of Spring (and a new feature)

[Cache - #150]

In the Great White North, it might not feel like it - but today is the first full day of Spring.  It is our annual, unmistakable sign that despite the snow still on the ground and the chill still in the air, warmer weather is on the way.

Probably.

The season of new promise and growth is upon us, but too many of us will still get out of bed and go to jobs that, if we’re honest with ourselves, we’re not happy with.  Or we will lead people who are – if we’re really honest with ourselves – not happy with us.

As yesterday was the Spring equinox, light has finally caught up to darkness.  Daytime and nighttime are now almost precisely the same length.  For the next three months – conveniently a fiscal quarter for the business minded – the length of our daytimes will continue to grow longer.

Will we grow with them?  And what in tarnation does this have to do with logos and websites?

The answer, of course, is nothing.  To paraphrase subscriber Tom (from Cache #111), branding is about gaining a deep understanding of who you are, as either an individual or organization, and then helping others achieve that level.

Or I as suggested in that same blogpost, branding is about helping people achieve a deep understanding of the unique value you offer the world, validating your worth and helping you achieve your highest emotional, intellectual, spiritual and financial potential.

Just slightly more important than a logo or a website.

For the next 91 days, ending June 21st at 10:51am UT, what are you going to do about it?


NEW FEATURE:  CacheMeme!

IN THE MEDIA:  Andris Pone comment on the Super Bowl, WestJet, Tim Hortons, Lululemon, Indigo and more.

BOOK:  Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo or download a free chapter.

brand: it ain't the logo - The #1 Globe and Mail business bestseller - Ted Matthews with Andris Pone -

 

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Coyotes Eat Toronto FC Alive

[Cache - #149]

It is a myth that Canadians like winter.  A country that likes winter would not seek to escape it at every possible opportunity, as Canucks are doing on the busiest travel day of the year, today, by swarming our airports and border crossings in the hundreds of thousands.

For Canadians, leaving Canada is as Canadian as it gets.

As a proud holder of the Canadian passport, it was therefore my patriotic duty to report at Pearson International Airport two weeks ago, beating the rush and flying to Phoenix, Arizona.

The first thing one notices about Phoenix is that it shines.  Not just the sun, which shines almost always, but also the cars and buildings.  And the streets, being free of sludge in comparison to my home of Toronto, although in its defence, Toronto must wait for Fall to get rid of Rob Ford.

A second thing very much on the mind in Phoenix was their NHL hockey team, the Coyotes, just saved by a new ownership group that I am proud to say includes a family connection.  So it was an honour to attend a game last week against the St. Louis Blues.  Doing my best to keep my family bias aside, I was still genuinely impressed by the job the Coyotes have done on branding.

phoenix coyotes logo

It all revolves around and leverages a name rich with meaning in the Arizona desert, Coyotes.  The concepts conjured up by this name have been leveraged into a fun and exciting fan experience that forges a strong bond between the team and their fans (who have, as they must continue to do, grown in number since the new ownership).  For example, in addition to cheering the old fashioned way, Coyotes fans howl, which I must admit is alot of fun to do with 15,000 other people.

Screen Shot 2014-03-07 at 10.16.54 AM

The concepts of howling and the coyote are iterated everywhere not just in the Coyotes’ official marketing (the Den apparel store, a Happy “Howl-O-Ween” video from the team captain, the Paw Patrol cheerleading team, and the kids’ fan club, Howler’s Heroes, are but four examples) but are also perpetuated by fans – as in the fan blog Five For Howling, for example.

Compare the leverage you get from a great name like Coyotes with that bestowed by a meaningless name like TFC.  As in Toronto FC (Football Club), the name of Toronto’s Major League Soccer Franchise.  Visit their website and try to find any marketing program that leverages the team name in a way that expresses the team’s values.

The Coyotes’ name gives rise to unique ways of supporting the team that perpetuate brand values:  ferocity, tenacity, pack mentality, hunger to win.  As in this seasons’ slogan, Hungrier than Ever, an acknowledgement that having been given a rebirth, the team must work harder than ever to win games, fan support and corporate support to survive.

The TFC name, being purely descriptive, raises no ideas whatsoever in the mind and is very difficult to work with in ways that express brand values and create bonds with fans.  You might as well call them Team X.  (I thought I was just kidding there, but that might actually be an improvement, as teams like the X-Men will tell you)

So what advice do I have for my Uncle Bill Dutton, a man almost twice my age and with ten times my experience?  Steam Whistle would be nice in the owner’s box.

NEW FEATURE:  CACHEMEME

cachememe - the two yotes

Posted in be remark-able, best brand names, brand experience, brand names, brand stories, key messaging | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

Want to Win? Ask Yourself Why.

[Cache - #148]

SPECIAL GUEST BLOGGER:  JENNIFER LOMAX

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We are very pleased to present a guest post by our strategic partner Jennifer Lomax, freelance consultant, Senior Strategic Planner at Harbinger and a member of Marketing Magazine’s Top 30 Under 30 for 2013.  This is Jennifer’s second guest post for Cache, her first being “Is This CEO a Jerk Or A Genius?” in August 2013.

Achievement in sport and business is generally defined by some countable standard: in fine dining it is Michelin stars; in the Olympics, it is medals; in business, it is dollars.

As someone who adores food, I long wondered what a Michelin Star actually meant. Specifically, I couldn’t reconcile how a Ghostbuster-esque blimp (RIP Harold Ramis) warranted enormous prices for a few tiny morsels.

michelin stars manghostbusters

Little did I anticipate that my recent Michelin experience would satisfy my skepticism and serve up an inspiring business lesson.

Long story short: to say that Eleven Madison Park, a three-Michelin-star landmark in New York City, served the best meal I’ve ever had would be a gross understatement. I was delivered the most incredible dining experience of my life and what will surely be one of my most cherished memories.

Having visited my share of expensive and not-so-impressive restaurants, it was truly difficult to get my head around the precision and splendour of the meal we enjoyed – until the bar manager (who mentioned he had worked his way up from a busboy) made this profound statement: “We are in the business of delivering unforgettable experiences.” That is to say, each and every member of the team strives toward a purpose, a “why?”, much greater than serving good food.

The lesson: Strong leadership, a great team and hard work almost always contribute to success, but purpose is the real difference maker. Purpose is, as Simon Sinek has so effectively argued, understanding “why?”.  It is a rallying cry – it inspires leaders, aligns teams and fuels hard work.

vancouver 2010 logosochi 2014 logo

As we have just seen in Sochi, nowhere is hard work more evident than in the Winter Olympic Games.

In Sochi, purpose counted: for the Russians for 33 medals, including 14 gold and the top spot in the medal count. This up from an unimpressive 15 medals in Vancouver, including only three gold and 11th spot in the standings.

To what may we attribute this Russian revolution?

Being the Olympic host elevates the Games from a test of athletic prowess to a showcase, broadcast worldwide, of national culture, strength and pride. For Russia, like Canada before it, hosting the Games forged a shared sense of purpose for government officials, athletes and fans. Common cause drove unprecedented funding, sponsorship and support for Russian athletic programs, while athletes were motivated to win on home soil (well, except for the hockey team), and fans came out in droves to support the home side.

As Vancouver and Sochi have proven on a grand scale, “starting with why” has profoundly positive implications for professional and personal endeavours alike.

In order to win, are you willing to give it a try?  If not, why not?

Jennifer.m.lomax@gmail.com

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If Canada Loses Today

[Cache - #147]

When Sidney Crosby scored four years ago, for a moment I thought I would pass out.  Maybe it was from jumping up too fast, but really it was from the following overwhelming feeling:  relief.

Not the unadulterated joy of victory, but the relief of knowing that we were the best in the world, period.  And almost as much, relief from knowing that the next four years would not be comprised of an endless Summit Series.  Not the type of 1972, but of self-flagellation in the form of grim meetings of the greatest hockey “minds” our country has to offer, along with the inevitable Royal Commission On The Quality of Our National Game, Which Is Clearly Falling Apart And Signals The Very Disintegration Of Our Society As We Know It, Which Is A Very Bad Thing Except That It Might, With Luck, Mean Less Don Cherry.

canadian women hockey goal post

But wait.  We only won by one goal, and that was in overtime.  Celebration erupted.  Royal Commission averted.  The fact that our best players were barely better than Beer League?  Forgotten.

Is the line between greatness and stinking really that thin?  In any arena that is intensely competitive, yes – because the margin of victory is destined to be narrow.  So if we intend to get to the height of our game and stay there, we must be eternally vigilant.  Or as Red Green would have it, in the most Canadian of warm admonishments, ”Keep your stick on the ice.”

Boys:  please win today.  Please.  If not for yourselves, if not for national pride - if not so we can enjoy the next four years - then at least for being rid of Beiber.

Your opinions are always welcome, especially if you disagree with something you read here.  Just click here, and go to the bottom of the post that appears.  You will always receive a response, along with our sincere appreciation for joining our community.

IN THE MEDIA:  Andris Pone comment on the Super Bowl, WestJet, Tim Hortons, Lululemon, Indigo and more.

BOOK:  Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo at Books for Business

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Sochi: A Bargain at Twice the Price

[Cache - #146]

Every four years, Canadians engage in a structured two-week exercise to reflect deeply about what it means to be a citizen of this country.  That two weeks is called the Winter Olympics, and with each edition we reach the conclusion that to be Canadian is to be more immensely proud than ever before.


Number of medals won by Canada at the Winter Olympics since 1924

The Winter Games are categorically the most effective technique of internal branding available to us, being the act of looking inward and then outward; whether in the context of a company or country, it is the act of gaining a deep, shared understanding of the unique value an institution offers its constituents, and then sharing it with the world - such that we all reach our highest emotional, intellectual, spiritual and financial potential.

In other words, the Winter Games are for Canada a wildly effective tool of national unity and ultimately, of global success.  Our Olympians from Quebec are not competing with the fleur-de-lis on their chests, but instead the word CANADA visible from a mile (pardon me, un kilomètre) away.  On the podium, their shoulders wrapped in the Maple Leaf, they are a model of national excellence to the world.

As reported in the Globe and Mail, ”Two weeks every two years, I feel Canadian,” tweeted “entertainment megastar and notable sovereigntist” Guy Lepage.  Former Parti Quebecois politician Pierre Curzi confessed “to being overtaken by incredible emotion.  Each time there is a medal, we all become Canadian, which in my case is a pretty serious matter.  That’s sport.  We get caught up in the beauty of the competition, the emotion, and there’s a national sentiment residing in all of us.”

This isn’t just about Quebec.  People anywhere east of Ottawa and west of Toronto at times and to varying degrees feel alienated from the powers-that-be.  And all of these regions have sent athletes to compete for their locale, certainly, but above all for Canada.

Stephen Harper has made Arctic sovereignty the centrepiece of his nation-building strategy.  Protecting our Arctic interests is an important national matter.  Yet in service of national success, an abundant, locked-in, long-term financial commitment to Canada’s Winter Olympics program could be his greatest legacy.

The Olympics costs Canada money.  Not Putin money, but lots of money nonetheless.  But compared to the long-term cost of fractious regional relations, or even of the country drifting apart or breaking up?  It’s an absolute bargain.


Thanks to subscriber Laurie T. for inspiring last week’s blogpost, “Bud Light Ad Fantastically Good.”  I welcome blog ideas from all readers. 

Your opinions are always welcome, especially if you disagree with something you read here.  Just click here, and go to the bottom of the post that appears.  You will always receive a response, along with our sincere appreciation for joining our community.

IN THE MEDIA:  Andris Pone comment on the Super Bowl, WestJet, Tim Hortons, Lululemon, Indigo and more.

BOOK:  Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo at Books for Business

brand: it ain't the logo - The #1 Globe and Mail business bestseller - Ted Matthews with Andris Pone -

Posted in brand culture, internal branding, what is branding? | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Bud Light Ad Fantastically Good

[Cache - #145]

It is the easiest thing in the world to be critical.  It can also be quite fun.  Dilbert creator Scott Adams, commenting on the future of employment, said that even the most ineffective individuals “can succeed at getting paid to criticize others.”

The pinnacle for Adams is to be an editor or publisher, “a position which allows you to criticize not only the people who do the real work, but also the people who criticize those people.  It just doesn’t get any better than that.”

And so in the branding world, it is a plum gig to write a blog that periodically finds room for improvement in the work of others.  I found myself ready to engage in just that kind of beat-down with respect to Bud Light’s new tagline, Here we go, which struck me as meaningless and therefore puzzling as to its application.

In other words, what in the world was Bud Light going to do with this tagline?

For those of you fortunate enough to have already seen what could be the best beer commercial ever made, the answer is transparently clear.  Aired during the Super Bowl, “Up For Whatever” opens with a female actor asking a real and completely unsuspecting guy in a bar:  “If I give this to you (a bottle of Bud Light), are you up for whatever happens next?”

He says yes – so she takes him on a night on the town that has been entirely constructed for him by a film crew to which he is oblivious.  In what appear to him to be real, spontaneously-occurring events, at one moment a big-time Hollywood actor casually strolls onto his elevator with a llama, and in the next he is playing ping pong with a Bjorn Borg-esque Arnold Schwarzenegger.

The idea of beer making your wildest fantasies come true is not new.  From the Bud Girls to the Swedish Bikini Team, the idea that you can get drunk and get unbelievably lucky is among the most tired clichés in the advertising universe.  “Up For Whatever” dodges cliché by, bizarrely, making the fantastic seem actually real and attainable.

Whatever your tagline (or brand name or key message), it is incumbent upon you to work creatively and hard at bringing it fully to life.  Without the brilliant ad campaign Bud Light has created, Here we go had every imaginable possibility of (here comes the critic) stinking as a tagline.  In fact it still does – if Bud Light doesn’t have equally brilliant campaign elements in the hopper.

On the flip side, a tagline that seems on its face to be brilliant can be terrible if its promise is not delivered upon: how great is Banking can be this comfortable if the customer experience at TD starts to lack?

All of which means that it’s not the words that count – it’s what you do with them.  Really.


NEW MEDIA COMMENT:
In the Montreal Gazette:  Does sex still sell at the Super Bowl?

Your opinions are always welcome, especially if you disagree with something you read here.  Just click here, and go to the bottom of the post that appears.  You will always receive a response, along with our sincere appreciation for joining our community.

RADIO:
Interview re WestJet’s “Christmas Miracle” viral video 
CBC Radio One logo

TV:
Interview re Lance Armstrong’s brand (starts at 3:30, after the ad)

BNN logo

BOOK:
Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo at Books for Business

brand: it ain't the logo - The #1 Globe and Mail business bestseller - Ted Matthews with Andris Pone -

Posted in brand advertising, brand stories, key messaging, taglines | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

What Facebook Really Is

[Cache - #144]

As you know, Facebook is dying.  A pair of Princeton researchers reported last week that by 2017, 80% of Facebook’s core users will be gone.  A critical mass will have closed their accounts, complemented by a drastically reduced uptake, now underway, by kids and teens who find Facebook horribly uncool because their parents are on it.

Young people already on the site have grown bored by the interface, and are spending more time on shinier and newer social media platforms like Instagram (which lets you doctor a picture) and Snapchat (which lets you take a self-destructing selfie).

So Facebook will indeed go the way of the dodo, just as soon as human beings no longer need the validation, the love, of others.

Because I hesitate to call Facebook a love machine, I will call it a validation machine.

Above all, that’s what Facebook is.

When I shared a stunning photo of the sunrise last week, of course I was hoping that other people would “like” it.  I have Facebook friends who have posted more than 300 pictures of…themselves, which can only be explained by a deeply human desire to receive the appreciation and reassurance of other people, some of whom, in the Facebook world, are sure to “like” or say something positive about a picture posted by a friend.

The same psychology is behind every other Facebook activity, and for that matter every activity on Twitter, LinkedIn and every other social media platform.

Many people would be uncomfortable accepting this interpretation, for it implies that we are entirely self-serving beings.  Surely some of us do things purely for the benefit of others.  Yet in my branding work, when getting to a person or company’s core purpose (why they do what they do), it inevitably can be drilled down to this:  ”It makes me feel good.”  This, even though their reason for feeling good is usually that they have helped others.

Of all social media platforms, it is Facebook that provides the richest and most varied opportunities to share your life, receive the affirmation of others, and feel good.  Until another form of social media surpasses Facebook on this particular point, reports of its demise are greatly exaggerated.


NEW MEDIA COMMENT:
In today’s Montreal Gazette:  Does sex still sell at the Super Bowl?

Your opinions are always welcome, especially if you disagree with something you read here.  Just click here, and go to the bottom of the post that appears.  You will always receive a response, along with our sincere appreciation for joining our community.

RADIO:
Interview re WestJet’s “Christmas Miracle” viral video 
CBC Radio One logo

TV:
Interview re Lance Armstrong’s brand (starts at 3:30, after the ad)

BNN logo

BOOK:
Buy the #1 Globe and Mail bestselling Brand: It Ain’t the Logo at Books for Business

brand: it ain't the logo - The #1 Globe and Mail business bestseller - Ted Matthews with Andris Pone -

Posted in andris pone media comment, self-actualization | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment